The JS Foundation Focuses on Serverless and the Internet of Things

JavaScript has been around for ages, since the Netscape days. It’s the backbone of the modern web experience. However, the technology is being used beyond websites. In 2016, the jQuery Foundation and Dojo Foundation were merged to create the JS Foundation to drive broad adoption and ongoing development of key JavaScript solutions and related technologies.

At the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Leadership Summit , held this month in Sonoma, California, Alex Williams , founder of The New Stack, sat down with Kris Borchers , Executive Director of the JS Foundation , to talk about the focus of the foundation.

Borchers spoke about the history of the foundation when jQuery Foundation and Dojo Foundation merged. As the foundations came together, the number of Javascript projects also grew. Borchers said that the foundation is currently supporting 28 Javascript projects, including some of the most widely used JavaScript libraries out there.

When asked what value the foundation brings to these JavaScript projects, Borchers said it has a mentorship program at the JS Foundation. When a project is accepted, the foundation helps it become sustainable and healthy. It helps diversify the maintainer base, so if one organization decides to pull out of the project, it won’t kill the project. He clarified that the mentorship program doesn’t dictate how to write code or make decisions. All of these projects have self-governance models. They make their own decisions, however. What the mentorship program does is provide them with guidelines and a process that they can follow.

“We can take a step back and look at it from the outside to help them make the project more successful,” said Borchers.

Borchers said that theInternet of Things andserverless are two growing use cases of JavaScript.

In this Edition:

  • 1:47: How the JS Foundation got to have 28 projects in it.
  • 4:16: What are the values is the JS Foundation trying to uphold.
  • 6:52:  Some of the themes it is going to be following this year.
  • 9:09:  Proof of that serverless story.
  • 10:21: How to break things, not too badly.
  • 11:12: How event-based principles and practices fit in with the JS Foundation?

The Linux Foundation , which manages the JS Foundation, is a sponsor of The New Stack.

關鍵詞:Foundation Serverless


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